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Digibyte: RFID for the win

While companies continue creating virtual realities, the Mir:ror from Paris-based tech company Violet (www.violet.net) aims for the exact opposite - using physical items to trigger pre-programmed information digitally. Small RFID stamps (Ztamps) are attached to everyday objects read by the Mir:ror, a puck-shaped device connected to the computer via USB, and a chain of activities follows, set in place by the user. A tween could affix a stamp to her keys and when she swipes it on the Mir:ror upon returning from school, her computer could automatically update her Facebook status to let her friends know that she's home. Or a stamped tot's teddy bear could signal the computer to play audio stories.
February 17, 2009

While companies continue creating virtual realities, the Mir:ror from Paris-based tech company Violet (www.violet.net) aims for the exact opposite – using physical items to trigger pre-programmed information digitally. Small RFID stamps (Ztamps) are attached to everyday objects read by the Mir:ror, a puck-shaped device connected to the computer via USB, and a chain of activities follows, set in place by the user. A tween could affix a stamp to her keys and when she swipes it on the Mir:ror upon returning from school, her computer could automatically update her Facebook status to let her friends know that she’s home. Or a stamped tot’s teddy bear could signal the computer to play audio stories.

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