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New study shows kids see few ads for healthy foods

The hubbub over possible links between childhood obesity and TV food advertising in the US isn't likely to die down anytime soon. And non-profit org The Kaiser Family Foundation's massive new study on children's ad-viewing habits will likely add more fuel to the fire.
March 29, 2007

The hubbub over possible links between childhood obesity and TV food advertising in the US isn’t likely to die down anytime soon. And non-profit org The Kaiser Family Foundation’s massive new study on children’s ad-viewing habits will likely add more fuel to the fire.

The study found that US tweens see an average of 21 food ads on TV everyday, or 7,600 food spots per year. Teens 13 to 17 see slightly fewer at 17 per day, while kids two to seven have the least exposure at 12 food ads daily or 4,400 per year.

As for what kind of ads are targeting kids, the study found that 34% showcase candy and snacks, 28% promote cereal, and 10% highlight fast food. Of the 8,854 ads reviewed in the study, none of the kid-targeted spots advertised fruits or vegetables.

The study is based on a sample of 1,638 hours of TV content, including a detailed analysis of 8,854 food ads that aired on 13 US networks, including ABC, NBC, Nickelodeon and Disney.

About The Author
Gary Rusak is a freelance writer based in Toronto. He has covered the kids entertainment industry for the last decade with a special interest in licensing, retail and consumer products. You can reach him at garyrusak@gmail.com

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