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Making toon creations come alive

Boston-based software company Solid Works has teamed-up with Burlington, Massachusetts's Z Corporation to bring computer-generated models into the real world via their Cosmic Modelz service. Solid Works introduced the Cosmic Blobs computer program in early 2005. Designed for children as young as seven, the software acts as a 3-D model maker and allows kids to manipulate simple digital shapes.
September 1, 2006

Boston-based software company Solid Works has teamed-up with Burlington, Massachusetts’s Z Corporation to bring computer-generated models into the real world via their Cosmic Modelz service. Solid Works introduced the Cosmic Blobs computer program in early 2005. Designed for children as young as seven, the software acts as a 3-D model maker and allows kids to manipulate simple digital shapes.

Cosmic Modelz takes the designs to the next level, turning the digital renderings into real plaster-like models. Scott Harris, co-founder of Solid Works and creator of Cosmic Blobs, says the resulting figure withstands more wear and tear than pottery, but is not as strong as a plastic toy. In the end, the Modelz are really intended for collecting and display.

After making a design with Cosmic Blobs, kids can then go to the Cosmic Modelz website, which should go live before the end of the year, to upload their creations. Using mom or dad’s credit card, they can slap down US$25 for a small model or US$50 for a large one. The figure will show up on their doorsteps within one to two weeks.

Harris says Solid Works does not have any licensing agreements at this time, but the possibility is certainly on the table.

Those interested should contact product manager Steven DeBenedictis (sdebenedictis@cosmicblobs.com) to get the ball rolling.

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