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Nintendo Revolution-izes gameplay with one-handed controller

Nintendo is gearing up to take a giant leap forward in console gaming innovation next year, when it rolls out a new controller designed for flexible one-handed play. Resembling a TV remote with the sleek styling and color option appeal of an iPod, the app breaks with 20 years of two-handed video game tradition. It's designed to wirelessly track a player's arm movements, so pointing, swinging, twisting and hitting motions now control the on-screen action, transforming what was once a sedentary game experience into a much more physical one. The new controller is a central component of Nintendo's next-generation Revolution game console, but it will also be compatible with games from the NES, SNES, N64 and Nintendo GameCube generations.
November 1, 2005

Nintendo is gearing up to take a giant leap forward in console gaming innovation next year, when it rolls out a new controller designed for flexible one-handed play. Resembling a TV remote with the sleek styling and color option appeal of an iPod, the app breaks with 20 years of two-handed video game tradition. It’s designed to wirelessly track a player’s arm movements, so pointing, swinging, twisting and hitting motions now control the on-screen action, transforming what was once a sedentary game experience into a much more physical one. The new controller is a central component of Nintendo’s next-generation Revolution game console, but it will also be compatible with games from the NES, SNES, N64 and Nintendo GameCube generations.

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