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Jim Henson’s first big TV break came with the launch of Children’s Television Workshop’s Sesame Street in 1969.

CTW group president of film, TV and video Alice Cahn says: 'Henson has continually understood the needs and interests of children and families. That adherence to their target audience acts as the touchstone that allows them to go and do wacky...
December 1, 1999

CTW group president of film, TV and video Alice Cahn says: ‘Henson has continually understood the needs and interests of children and families. That adherence to their target audience acts as the touchstone that allows them to go and do wacky and funny things. The market is very different from 30 years ago, but we still work closely with Henson as co-producers on international versions of Sesame Street. We are also talking about collaborating with them on a project which would speak to the adults who care for children. Between us, we have managed to ensure consistency in what we create, while also reinventing our output so that it stays contemporary and relevant.’

CTW’s general counsel and executive VP Dan Victor adds: ‘Our relationship with Henson is one of the most successful creative partnerships in the history of television. Right from the first episode, CTW and the troupe of Muppeteers worked so well together. Henson licensed the Sesame Street Muppets to CTW in perpetuity. The only one who crossed over to The Muppet Show was Kermit, who always had a special status as the stage manager. He was like Jim Henson’s alter ego. Today, the emotional bond between Henson and CTW remains. With Bear in the Big Blue House, we do compete, but we share the view there is room enough for quality kids programming.’

‘We have worked particularly closely with Cheryl Henson, who has been the organization’s main liaison with us. She continues to be very involved in the socially progressive aspects of our partnership, such as the Israeli/Palestinian and South African co-productions of Sesame Street.’

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